Keep Cool with Weber County Splash Pads

waterslide-398249_640One of summer’s greatest challenges is beating the heat. Don’t let those high temperatures and blaring sun get you down. Keep as cool as a cucumber this summer with these fun and fairly reasonable options all within or very close to Weber County.

Riverdale Splash Pad
Bring the whole family to enjoy a variety of water activities and features at the Riverdale Splash Pad. The park and splash pad are located at 4300 South Parker Drive just east of the Riverdale Fire Department. This splash pad season runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The splash pad is open Monday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. with the exception of Wednesday mornings when the splash pad opens at noon. The delayed opening is due to routine maintenance.

South Ogden Nature Park & Splash Pad
Cool off with the family at the South Ogden Nature Park with two playgrounds and a splash pad. This tucked away gem is located at 5874 S. Park Vista Drive right behind the Ogden Athletic Club. This park is open year round, however, the splash pad is open daily from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day. There also is a pavilion that community member can rent. Residents get a discount!

Harrisville Park & Splash Pad
Community members say that the Harrisville Park is a “Great place to take the kids to play ball or on the playground, lots of room and a frisbee golf course and splash park.” The park is located just off of Highway 89 at 1350 N. Hwy 89. This splash pad is also open from Memorial Day to Labor Day and operates Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Spring Gardening Tips

Spring is a time when the sun is shining and flowers are blossoming. Who doesn’t love a good set of flowers in the spring time. It helps ease tension and soothes the mind.

Many people are interested in gardening during the spring time but have less than adequate knowledge on how to go about things. This article explains some top spring gardening tips for fans of this great hobby. dog-1310545_640

  • Get Tools and Plants: Tune up devices so everything is prepared when things begin gathering pace. Make note of what is missing, and arrange instruments for the new developing season. Pick new plants for the garden. Arrange perennials, trees, and bushes for spring planting.
  • Mow: Send the trimmer and leaf blower for maintenance, or in the event that you have the correct instruments, hone the cutter edges yourself. Refill your trimmer with oil, introduce crisp start plugs, and grease up moving parts if necessary. Clear the grass of winter extras and search for ranges that need reseeding before cutting.
  • Prepare New Beds: Clear the planting territory when soil can be worked, expelling weeds and garbage. Spread a 4-inch layer of fertilizer or all around spoiled compost and any changes over soil, and develop it to a profundity of 10 to 12 inches with a spading fork.
  • Plant: Plant exposed root trees, bushes, and perennials, for example, hostas and daylilies by early spring. Pick a cool, shady day if conceivable. Transplant compartment developed plants at whatever time amid the developing season with the exception of midsummer; make sure to water them altogether. Sow seeds of cool-season blossoms like sweet peas, poppies, and calendula, and vegetables, for example, lettuce, parsley, and spinach.
  • Fertilize: Apply adjusted manure, angle emulsion, or other soil corrections suggested by soil-test comes about around trees and bushes when new development shows up. Spread high-corrosive compost and pine-needle mulch around corrosive cherishing bushes like azaleas and camellias. Start treating perennials when dynamic development resumes.
  • Survey Yard: Make note of tree limbs that ought to be evacuated or cabled, particularly those that shade structures. Enlist an arborist to keep up vast trees. Rake mulch from beds planted with globules before foliage shows up, and invigorate mulch in other planting ranges after soil warms. Check wall, steps, and pathways for deterioration brought on by solidifying and defrosting.
  • Time: Patience is key since everything that’s good takes time to get around. The same can be said for plants and gardens. Many people get frustrated by the lack of growth when they start a gardening project. All they need to do is keep at it and have a little patience. It will indeed pay off in the long run.

In conclusion, these gardening tips are not very complicated and easy to follow. What’s more interesting is that they are effective and efficient.

Spring is a time when the mood is joyous and what better way than to get your gardening game on point. After all, it’s not just good for people but also the environment we live in.

Utah’s Canine Friendly Parks

Naturally, dog parks benefit our beloved four-legged friends, but did you know they have many benefits for humans and the community as a whole? Experienced dog park goers understand that these parks provide socialization opportunities including dog-to- dog, dog-to- people and people-to-people interactions. Arrange a doggy play date today at one of these more than friendly dog parks!

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  • South Ogden Dog Park
    Located on Palmer Drive, the South Ogden Dog Park provides a wooded area and ample running space for canine friends and plenty of park benches for their owners. This park also boasts a two-acre fenced area for off-leash play.
  • Roy City Dog ParkThis little dog park is nothing fancy, but canines and owners can enjoy the cleanliness and quietness that the Roy Dog Park offers. Currently, the city is striving to raise funds for improvements to the park. So bring your pets out for some off-leash fun and exercise.
  • Ogden City Dog Park
    With more than 1.75 acres of land set aside, the Ogden Dog Park provides the opportunity for licensed dogs to run, play and socialize in designated, fenced-in areas.
    The park accommodates both small and large dogs.

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  • Legacy Dog Park
    This off-leash dog park is free to all licensed dogs and owners. Legacy Dog Park is open from sun-up to sun-down and provides areas for small and large dogs to play. You also can reserve the park for private events.
  • Farmington Dog Park
    Located just southwest of Station Park, the Farmington Dog park offers a separate small dog area along with plenty of drinking water, shade and benches. The park is open from dusk to dawn.

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  • Tanner Park
    This park includes a little-league field, tennis courts, paved walkways, a playground and an off-leash dog park. The enclosed area offers the space to let your pups run free and a pool for them to cool off afterward. This park is meant to be walked, giving both owners and pets plenty of fresh air and exercise.
  • Parley’s Nature Reserve
    This little gem not only offers 68 acres of walking and jogging paths, but an off-leash dog walking area as well. Natural water spots and streams can quench even the most active dogs thirst. With plenty of dogs running at all times, this park provides a haven for dog lovers and enthusiasts.
  • Memory Grove Park
    This serene park includes fountains, monuments, creek-side paths, picnic tables and an off-leash area for your four-legged friends. With its beautiful walking trails, this park is ideal for dogs and owners. Get out for a stroll today and gush over all of the pups.
  • Lindsey Gardens
    Another great park with complete with many options for attendees including ball diamonds, playgrounds, pavilions, restrooms, picnic tables, drinking fountains and an off-leash area for the dogs of course. This 15.25-acre park can be reserved for special events here.